Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin are Studio Formafantasma, a design studio based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The studio often look at issues such as the relationship between tradition and local culture, sustainability and the context between an object and the surrounding historical, political and social factors. Throughout their work traditional, craft methods and process are often applied in new and contemporary ways.

This kind of approach has led to them being commissioned by companies such as Fendi, Droog and Established and Sons, as well as having work permanently on show in New York's MoMA, London’s Victoria and Albert and New York's Metropolitan Museum, among others.

Material experiments and investigations also feature heavily throughout their work. Previous projects include “Botanica” commissioned by Plart a foundation dedicated to scientific research, recovery, restoration and conservation of works of art and design produced in plastic. The studio designed objects as if the "oil-based era, in which we are living, never took place,” investigating natural polymers extracted from plants and animal derivatives such as rubber, shellac and bois durci (a 19th century material composed of saw dust and animal blood.) 

Like much of their work the studio often looked to the past to inform the future, in their words: "offering a new perspective on plasticity, reinterpreting centuries-old technology lost beneath the flawless surface of mass production.” 

Previously forgotten materials and processes were used to create interesting and archaic materials and textures all culminating in a series of vessels, which was presented alongside their material experimentations. 

Other works by the duo have included investigations into the eruption of mount etna as a natural process of creation for materials and the connotations of charcoal - often seen as a dirty, pollutant and something that is left after destruction repurposed - as water filters and something that has almost life giving properties.  

In March 2011 Paola Antonelli of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and esteemed design critic Alice Rawsthorn listed their studio amongst a handful of practices that would shape the future of design.